Knox Preserve

A rustic bench along one of the trails affords birders a place to pause as they search for birds.
A rustic bench along one of the trails affords birders a place to pause as they search for birds. Judy Benson/The Day

Knox Preserve

Town: Stonington

Directions: Take I-95 to Exit 90, then head south on Route 27 to Route 1 north (Stonington Road). After a little over a mile turn right onto Wilcox Road. Preserve entrance is on the right next to Miner Cemetery, near the intersection of Route 1, Wilcox Road and Cove Road.

Where to Park: There is a small parking area at the entrance, and cars can also park along the north side of Wilcox Road.

Description: This small but significant area attracts dozens of migratory bird species in spring and fall, as well as birds that nest there in the spring and summer. A variety of habitats attract songbirds, ground-nesting birds, hawks and shorebirds. About a mile of unmarked, interconnected trails traverse the property. The parcel is close to 17.5 acres, about 10 of which is used by a local farmer to raise corn and hay and as pastureland.

Regulations: Open sunrise to sunset; dogs must be on a leash no longer than 7 feet at all times; passive recreational uses – hiking, birdwatching, photography – are permitted. No bikes or horses.

Amenities: None.

Natural Features: Early successional and grassland habitat as well as coastal area along Quiambog Cove.

Fees: Free. Users of properties are encouraged to become members in Avalonia, as there are costs associated with maintenance. Membership forms at: http://www.avalonialandconservancy.org/DONORS-MEMBERSINFO.html

Owned by: Avalonia Land Conservancy

More information: www.avalonialandconservancy.org

Robert Dewire unties the rope to open the gate to Knox Preserve in Stonington.
Robert Dewire unties the rope to open the gate to Knox Preserve in Stonington. Judy Benson/The Day
Knox Preserve, along Quiambog Cove in Stonington, is owned by the Avalonia Land Conservancy.
Knox Preserve, along Quiambog Cove in Stonington, is owned by the Avalonia Land Conservancy. Judy Benson/The Day
Interconnected trails through Knox Preserve pass through early successional, woodlands, coastal and field habitats.
Interconnected trails through Knox Preserve pass through early successional, woodlands, coastal and field habitats. Judy Benson/The Day
One of a previous year's nests is visible in some low branches in early spring, before the trees and shrubs are in full leaf.
One of a previous year's nests is visible in some low branches in early spring, before the trees and shrubs are in full leaf. Judy Benson/The Day
Robert Dewire stops along one of the trails to scan the treetops for migratory birds.
Robert Dewire stops along one of the trails to scan the treetops for migratory birds. Judy Benson/The Day
The trail passes alongside Quiambog Cove.
The trail passes alongside Quiambog Cove. Judy Benson/The Day
Early successional and woodland habitat attract many migratory songbirds to Knox Preserve.
Early successional and woodland habitat attract many migratory songbirds to Knox Preserve. Judy Benson/The Day
Blooming shadbush is one of the native shrubs that attracts birds that prefer early successional habitat.
Blooming shadbush is one of the native shrubs that attracts birds that prefer early successional habitat. Judy Benson/The Day
Cedars throughout the preserve are a favorite of cedar waxwings.
Cedars throughout the preserve are a favorite of cedar waxwings. Judy Benson/The Day
A fisherman on the railroad bridge at Quiambog Cove can be seen in the distance from one of the spots alongside the main trail.
A fisherman on the railroad bridge at Quiambog Cove can be seen in the distance from one of the spots alongside the main trail. Judy Benson/The Day
Lilacs bloom along the trail in spring.
Lilacs bloom along the trail in spring. Judy Benson/The Day

View Knox Preserve in a larger map
Hide Comments

READER COMMENTS

Loading comments...
Hide Comments