Baseball Notes

Upton, Braves finalize $75.25M, 5-year deal

Jason Heyward was in the audience as B.J. Upton was introduced Thursday as Atlanta's new centerfielder.

That made manager Fredi Gonzalez smile as he realized he didn't have to worry so much about finding the third starter in his outfield.

"Shoot, we may not even need a left fielder," Gonzalez said. "With him playing center and Jason, who just won a Gold Glove, in right, it's going to be fun watching these guys cover some ground in the outfield."

Upton was given a No. 2 Braves jersey after finalizing a $75.25 million, five-year contract - the biggest ever given a free agent by the franchise. He gets a $3 million signing bonus payable by Dec. 31 and salaries of $12.45 million next season, $13.45 million in 2014, $14.45 million in 2015, $15.45 million in 2016 and $16.45 million in 2017.

The 28-year-old spent his first eight big seasons with Tampa Bay. He hit .246 with 28 homers, 78 RBIs and 31 steals this year and replaces Michael Bourn in center. He is not expected to fill Bourn's role as a leadoff hitter.

Braves general manager Frank Wren said adding a right-handed hitter gives more balance to a lineup that includes left-handed hitters Brian McCann, Freddie Freeman and Heyward. Wren said the right-handed power from a centerfielder made Upton especially attractive.

"It's one thing to have a leadoff hitter, which has been great for us, having that true leadoff hitter," Wren said, referring to Bourn. "We feel like we can find that or create that. But to get someone who can play center field at (Upton's) caliber and can also hit 20 to 30 home runs, that's a different dimension. We felt like that would really add to our offense and make our offense deeper.

"We were so left-handed dominant over the last number of years," Wren added. "Now to be able to better balance our lineup left and right, that was something we felt could really enhance our team."

Martin Prado is expected to move from left field to replace the retired Chipper Jones at third base. Wren said he believes third base is Prado's best position, but he said Prado's versatility gives the team options during talks at next week's winter meetings.

"It narrows our focus a little more, whether it's leadoff or left field or that combination," Wren said. "Martin Prado can continue to play left field ... and he can go to third base, so we have some flexibility with the way our roster is constructed."

Wren said internal options in the search for a new leadoff hitter include Prado and shortstop Andrelton Simmons, who hit .289 as a rookie.

Upton, also courted by Philadelphia, said he was won over when he visited the Braves on Nov. 15. Gonzalez, Wren and former manager Bobby Cox were part of the Braves' welcoming committee.

"I came in on that trip and really never felt like that before," Upton said. "They really made me feel like I was part of the Braves family. ... Bobby was great. It feels like I've known him for years. These guys, they got me. There's no other way to put it. They had me when I came here and I left and I felt really good about it."

Upton's home run totals have increased in each of the last three seasons, but he has hit below .250 with more than 150 strikeouts in four straight years.

Nationals get Span from Twins

The Washington Nationals acquired Denard Span from the Minnesota Twins for minor league pitcher Alex Meyer, giving the reigning NL East champions a natural center fielder and leadoff hitter - and setting off a chain reaction in the lineup both offensively and defensively.

A career .284 hitter with 90 steals and a .357 on-base percentage during five seasons with the Twins, Span comes to the Nationals with a set of talents the team has been seeking since it moved to Washington in 2005.

"He's going to bring a dimension to the club that we haven't had before," general manager Mike Rizzo said, "a fast-moving, exciting guy that makes contact and moves the guy around and can fly around the field."

Span's arrival allows the Nationals to move 20-year-old Bryce Harper to a corner outfield spot - probably left field, with Jayson Werth staying in right. Michael Morse could then move to first base - the position played by free agent slugger Adam LaRoche.

Rizzo said the team is still in talks with LaRoche and has entertained some trade queries about Morse, so either player could end up at first next season.

"It gives us some options in dealing with our roster," Rizzo said.

Harper, a converted catcher, had some adventures in center field this season but was also a sparkplug, doing enough with his bat and glove to win the NL's Rookie of the Year award.

"He's a terrific young center fielder," Rizzo said. "But we felt for his long-term development and his career path that we wanted to move him out of a taxing position of center field, both mentally taxing and physically taxing. We've accomplished that."

Reliever Pat Neshek, A's agree at $975,000

Right-handed reliever Pat Neshek and the Oakland Athletics reached agreement on a $975,000, one-year contract, avoiding salary arbitration.

The AL West champion A's rallied around Neshek after his newborn son, Gehrig, died 23 hours after his birth just before the playoffs began last month. Oakland players took the field wearing patches in the baby's honor during their five-game division series loss to the Detroit Tigers.

He went 2-1 with a 1.37 ERA in 24 appearances with the A's after being acquired from Baltimore on Aug. 3 for cash considerations. Neshek, who made $825,000 last year, was 3-2 with 11 saves and a 2.66 ERA in 35 Triple-A appearances before joining Oakland.

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