NFL notes

AP Source: Webster, Baas rework contracts for 2013

New York Giants cornerback Corey Webster and center David Baas have re-worked their contracts for the 2013 season with the team, a person familiar with the situation said Thursday.

The person, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the Giants haven't announced the deals, told The Associated Press that the starters and the team just finished work on the contracts.

NFL Network first reported the agreements and said Webster took a $3 million pay cut. He had a disappointing 2012 season and will earn $4 million in the final year of his contract.

NFL Network also said Baas re-structured his five-year contract. He still will earn $4.25 million in third year but his base pay was lowered to $1.25 million. The other $3 million will come as a signing bonus.

The moves combined will clear roughly $6 million in cap space for the Giants, giving them $9 million for free agency.

The Giants, who missed the playoffs with a 9-7 record after winning the Super Bowl the previous season, could create more space if they rework tackle David Diehl's contract. He is due to make $4.475 million this season, and also had a sub-par year in 2012.

New York may need more money with receiver Victor Cruz, halfback Andre Brown and safety Stevie Brown all being restricted free agents.

The 31-year-old Webster had 58 tackles, 13 passes defended and four interceptions last season for a defense that was ranked next to last in the league However, he also saw receivers that he was covering catch at least a half-dozen touchdowns.

Webster played a major role in the Giants two recent Super Bowl titles, with his interception of a Brett Favre pass in overtime, setting up Lawrence Tynes game-winning field goal in the NFC title game against the Green Bay Packers early in 2008.

Baas was signed as a free agent after the Giants released Shaun O'Hara after the NFL lockout ended before the 2011 season. He has started the past two seasons but also has been limited by nagging injuries in his short tenure.

Saturday signs contract to retire with Colts

Indianapolis gave Jeff Saturday a chance to fulfill his NFL dream.

On Thursday, he came back to thank the town and the team that embraced his improbable journey from undrafted free agent to NFL star.

Moments after signing his final contract with the Colts, Indy's longtime center and a key figure in forging a settlement to the 2011 NFL lockout officially retired with the team that brought him into the league 14 years ago.

"This does not happen for many players, especially many offensive linemen," Saturday said. "I'm excited to retire as a Colt. I mean, this is my home. This is what we've supported for so many years. I was known, no matter what team I was playing for, as a Colt. So it's good to put that horseshoe on and go out that way."

Colts fans will always remember Saturday for his gritty play and down-to-earth attitude. Nationally, he will forever be known as the voice of reason during the contentious lockout negotiations. Saturday lobbied on behalf of the players he represented and constantly urged both sides to remember that they would be best served by reaching a settlement rather than losing the "golden goose."

After the two sides agreed to a 10-year collective bargaining agreement, Saturday's embrace of Patriots owner Robert Kraft became an endearing image of labor peace. Kraft had just finished speaking about his wife, Myra, who died during the negotiations, when Saturday put aside Indy's bitter rivalry with New England, hugged Kraft and then credited him for "saving football."

Challenge to Redskins name begins anew

The latest round is under way in the attempt by Native Americans to strip the Washington Redskins of their federal trademark petition.

Both sides appeared Thursday in a 90-minute hearing before three judges on the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board.

A lawyer representing a group of American Indians said the word "redskin" is a slur, but the case isn't that simple. The plaintiffs have to show the name Washington Redskins was disparaging to a significant population of Native Americans when the team was granted its trademarks decades ago.

General Manager Bruce Allen said afterward that he doesn't know if it's been proven that the name is offensive and that the team has no plans to change it.

The judges might take as long as a year to issue a ruling.

Hide Comments

READER COMMENTS

Loading comments...
Hide Comments