Getting the Morgan shipshape

Buy Photo Sean D. Elliot/The Day Matt Otto, lead rigger at the Mystic Seaport's H.B. duPont Preservation Shipyard, dangles off the side of the whaleship Charles W. Morgan to attach chainplates to the hull Monday. Chainplates are the anchor points for the ship's standing rig, the cables that hold the ship's masts upright. The Morgan, the last remaining wooden whaling ship and the oldest American commercial vessel in existence, was relaunched in July and will embark on its 38th voyage, a tour of historic New England ports, this summer.

Matt Otto, lead rigger at the Mystic Seaport's H.B. duPont Preservation Shipyard, dangles off the side of the whaleship Charles W. Morgan to attach chainplates to the hull Monday. Chainplates are the anchor points for the ship's standing rig, the cables that hold the ship's masts upright. The Morgan, the last remaining wooden whaling ship and the oldest American commercial vessel in existence, was relaunched in July and will embark on its 38th voyage, a tour of historic New England ports, this summer.

Matt Barnes, a shipwright at Mystic Seaport's H.B. duPont Preservation Shipyard, sweeps up the shavings from making feathers to fill gaps between deck planks in the blubber room of the whaleship Charles W. Morgan Monday.
Buy Photo Sean D. Elliot/The Day Matt Barnes, a shipwright at Mystic Seaport's H.B. duPont Preservation Shipyard, sweeps up the shavings from making feathers to fill gaps between deck planks in the blubber room of the whaleship Charles W. Morgan Monday.
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