DAR chapter celebrates 125th anniversary

Members of the Lucretia Shaw Chapter of the DAR:
Jennifer Emerson seated (holding photo of c1896 members of Lucretia Shaw Chapter)
Row 1 — Millie LaMarche, Alice Dickenson, Marilyn Davis, State Regent CTDAR Alice Ridgway, Chapter Regent Sandra Bullock, State Historian Nancy Merwin, Mary Cutillo, Kristin Crandall, Ruth Celotto, Carleen Sutton
Row 2 — Suzanne Matteson, Aimee Matteson, Liz Kuchta, Vange Sargent SE District Director, Cindy Furr, Lesley Sollima, Karen Stackpole, Cathy Grohocki, Nancy Carpenter, Candace Crossley, 
Row 3 — Therese Ratliff, Susan Pasquale Cheryl Dixon, Abigail Perkins, Ruth Perkins, Karen Graf, Sarah King
(photo submitted)
Members of the Lucretia Shaw Chapter of the DAR: Jennifer Emerson seated (holding photo of c1896 members of Lucretia Shaw Chapter) Row 1 — Millie LaMarche, Alice Dickenson, Marilyn Davis, State Regent CTDAR Alice Ridgway, Chapter Regent Sandra Bullock, State Historian Nancy Merwin, Mary Cutillo, Kristin Crandall, Ruth Celotto, Carleen Sutton Row 2 — Suzanne Matteson, Aimee Matteson, Liz Kuchta, Vange Sargent SE District Director, Cindy Furr, Lesley Sollima, Karen Stackpole, Cathy Grohocki, Nancy Carpenter, Candace Crossley,  Row 3 — Therese Ratliff, Susan Pasquale Cheryl Dixon, Abigail Perkins, Ruth Perkins, Karen Graf, Sarah King (photo submitted)

The Lucretia Shaw Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution was organized on Oct. 21, 1892, in New London.

Lucretia Harris Shaw was the wife of Nathaniel Shaw Jr., naval adjutant for Connecticut during the Revolutionary War. When General George Washington visited New London in April 1776, he enjoyed a fine meal and, no doubt, meaningful conversation with Lucretia and her husband.

On Sept. 6, 1781, Benedict Arnold sacked and burned New London, but Shaw Mansion was unharmed.

Soldiers surviving the Battle of Groton Heights on the same day were confined to prison ships, and disease became rampant. It was Lucretia who opened the doors of her grand home to personally tend the sick and the dying.

She contracted gaol fever, and died on Dec. 11, 1781. Nathaniel died soon after.

This DAR chapter has been active for over a century, fulfilling its mission of honoring the past and contributing to the future. For example, in the spirit of keeping important memories alive, we plan to mark the grave of Charlotte Burbeck, daughter of Gen. Henry Burbeck, who served with great distinction in both the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812.

Some of our current civic and educational projects include donating to the Rocky Hill Veterans Home, honoring New London High School ROTC students, conferring Excellence in American History Awards to deserving middle school students and recognizing community-minded high school seniors with Good Citizen Awards.

In September, our 125th anniversary was celebrated at the Shaw Mansion with a Special Tea, using period recipes. A tour of the mansion followed, and a video of our chapter accomplishments brought us back to present.

Honored guest was Connecticut DAR State Regent Alice Ridgway.

Guest speaker for this month’s meeting was Tammy Marzik, from the office of community outreach and advocacy of the Department of Veterans Affairs in Rocky Hill.

We proudly carry on the work that began 125 years ago in honor of Lucretia Shaw.

If you’re interested in becoming a member or simply would like more information about our chapter, visit lucretiashawdar.org.

Sandra Bullock is regent of the New London-based Lucretia Shaw Chapter, Daughters of the the American Revolution.

Note: Kindness in Real Life is a regular feature in which we encourage writers to tell about kind acts being done in the community. To submit your own story and photos, email Lee Howard at l.howard@theday.com.

Original members of the Lucretia Shaw chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. (photo submitted)
Original members of the Lucretia Shaw chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. (photo submitted)

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