NFL notes

This photo provided by Mary Tivnan shows a front page of an early edition of The Boston Globe in North Fort Myers, Fla. The front page of some early editions of New England's largest newspaper ran the headline, "A Bitter End" over an image of fallen New England quarterback Tom Brady, suggesting the Patriots lost to Atlanta in Super Bowl 51. Boston-area editions ran the headline "Win For The Ages" and showed a triumphant Brady holding up the championship trophy after the Patriots mounted a furious rally and won 34-28 in overtime. (Mary Tivnan/AP Photo)

Official asks Texas Rangers to help find lost Brady jersey

Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick is asking the state's top law enforcement officers to help locate Tom Brady's missing game jersey, which disappeared from the New England Patriots' locker room after the Super Bowl.

The Republican said in a statement Monday that Brady's jersey "was stolen" after the Patriots beat the Atlanta Falcons 34-28 at Houston's NRG Stadium, and that city police were already investigating.

Patrick said Texas places "a very high value on hospitality and football," adding: "It is important that history does not record" that Brady's jersey was stolen in the state.

He continued: "Whoever took this jersey should turn it in" since the "Texas Rangers are on the trail."

Brady said after the game that the jersey was missing and joked that he expects to see it soon in an online auction.

"We have been looking into this disappointing matter and will continue to assist law enforcement authorities," NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said.

Fox draws audience of 111.3M for Super Bowl, down slightly

Fox drew an audience of 111.3 million viewers for the first Super Bowl to go into overtime, a smaller audience than the game has had in the last two years but still ranking among the biggest for a television program in the United States.

The top Super Bowl audience — and the biggest for any American TV show — was the 114.4 million viewers who saw the New England Patriots beat the Seattle Seahawks in 2015, according to the Nielsen company.

Viewership for the Patriots’ come-from-behind 34-28 win over the Atlanta Falcons on Sunday had a relatively modest start, perhaps because the Falcons don’t have much of a national profile. The game also looked like a rout in the third quarter, and some 4 million viewers slipped away around the time the Falcons took at 28-3 lead, Nielsen said.

People returned as the Patriots came alive. During overtime, the game had its biggest audience of 117.7 million, Nielsen said Monday. The overall audience figure of 111.3 million is an average of how many people were watching during a typical minute, taking into account the game’s peaks and valleys.

The audience was 117.5 million for Lady Gaga’s halftime performance, Nielsen said. Earlier in the day, Nielsen said 12.2 million watched President Donald Trump’s interview with Bill O’Reilly of Fox News Channel.

Last year’s Denver-Carolina game reached an audience of 111.9 million.

Some Boston Globe editions suggest Patriots lost Super Bowl

It wasn’t exactly “Dewey Defeats Truman,” but some Florida readers of The Boston Globe learned a different Super Bowl outcome than most on Monday morning.

Early editions of New England’s largest newspaper ran a front page suggesting the Patriots lost to the Atlanta Falcons on Sunday night, with a headline that read “A Bitter End” over a large image of star quarterback Tom Brady falling to his knees. The Falcons had a comfortable lead going into halftime, but the Patriots mounted a furious rally and won 34-28 in overtime for the franchise’s fifth championship.

It’s not clear how many readers received the incorrect front page. Globe officials didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment Monday.

Boston-area editions ran the headline “Win For The Ages” and showed a triumphant Brady holding up the championship trophy as confetti fell.

“When my husband saw that headline he absolutely bounced off the wall,” Mary Tivnan said of the front page they received in North Fort Myers, Florida, where the Brewster, Massachusetts, couple spends their winters.

Tivnan said her husband, Frank Tivnan — a former Boston Herald political reporter and spokesman for the late Boston Mayor Kevin White — went out Monday afternoon to scrounge up more copies of the Globe for posterity.

Globe subscriber M. Charles Bakst, a Rhode Islander also spending time in Fort Myers, Florida, said he sympathized with the deadline pressures that likely caused the Pulitzer Prize-winning news outlet to fumble a critical story for its readers.

Late games generally require newspapers lay out pages ahead of time so they can publish quickly.

But Bakst, a retired political columnist for The Providence Journal in Rhode Island, suggested a vaguer headline should have been used as a placeholder.

He said the headline reminded him of the famous front page the Chicago Daily Tribune ran following President Harry Truman’s 1948 re-election victory over challenger Thomas Dewey.

Bakst also wondered what impact the flub might have on the print newspaper industry broadly, which has been struggling as more people turn to social media and online news sources.

“I worry that this incident might cause some readers to say, ‘That’s it, I’m done with newspapers,’” he said.

Pats comeback earns fan date with tennis star Genie Bouchard

Forget the Lombardi Trophy. The New England Patriots’ shocking comeback win over the Atlanta Falcons in Super Bowl 51 earned one fan a date with Canadian tennis star Genie Bouchard.

With the Falcons holding a big lead over the Patriots Sunday, Bouchard tweeted that she “knew Atlanta would win.” A fan then asked her to go on a date if the Patriots somehow ended up winning and in what must have seemed like a low-risk reply, Bouchard said, “sure.”

Her final tweet of the night was one of resignation, “Lesson learned. Never bet against Tom Brady.”

The fan who asked for a date hasn’t said if Bouchard has gotten in touch to schedule their outing.

 

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