Court: Middle finger protected by the constitution

TAYLOR, Mich.  — When it comes to the middle finger, police might need a thicker skin.

A federal appeals court says a Michigan woman's constitutional rights were violated when she was handed a speeding ticket after giving the finger to a suburban Detroit officer in 2017. The decision means a lawsuit by Debra Cruise-Gulyas can proceed.

In a 3-0 decision Wednesday, the court said Taylor Officer Matthew Minard "should have known better," even if the driver was rude.

Minard stopped Cruise-Gulyas and wrote her a ticket for a lesser violation. But when that stop was over, Cruise-Gulyas raised her middle finger.

Minard pulled her over again and changed the ticket to a more serious speeding offense.

Cruise-Gulyas sued, saying her free-speech rights and her rights against unreasonable seizure were violated.

READER COMMENTS

Loading comments...
Hide Comments

Stories that may interest you

Fire-ravaged Notre Dame has been stabilized

Notre Dame's rector says a "computer glitch" may have been behind the fast-spreading fire that ravaged the cathedral


One of Alaska's warmest springs on record is causing a dangerous thaw

The average temperature for March recorded was 18.6 degrees Fahrenheit above normal.


Storms blast South, where tornadoes threaten several states

Strong storms are roaring across the South on Friday, after killing two Mississippi drivers and a woman in Alabama and leaving more than 100,000 people without power across Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas


Pope cites plight of migrants, children on Good Friday

Pope Francis at a Good Friday procession has cited the plight of unwanted migrants and abused children as some of the "crosses" of suffering in the world

TRENDING

PODCASTS