Local eminent domain film to be screened at library

“TRASHED,” a blend of documentary and drama made and screened 10 years ago by Nightshade Productions, will be shown for free on Aug. 19 at the New London Public Library, 63 Huntington St., New London.

The film, directed by local writer and filmmaker Nicholas Checker, premiered in 2005 and is being revisited in recognition of the 10th anniversary of the Kelo v. City of New London U.S Supreme Court case. “TRASHED” intercuts the fictitious story of a homeless young woman with commentary by documentarians on the subjects of eminent domain and homelessness.

Refreshments will be served. For further information, call (860) 444-8711.

READER COMMENTS

Loading comments...
Hide Comments

Stories that may interest you

WoodenBoat Show pulls into Mystic Seaport Museum

When organizers promise that the WoodenBoat Show has every kind of boat, they ain’t whistling Dixie. They list the various vessels that will be on display, and it’s a eye-popping lot, from fishing boats to cruising yachts, dinghies to performance shells. All in all, more than...


Chet and Bernie author Spencer Quinn visits Savoy Bookshop Wednesday

As Peter Abrahams is the author of some of the most respected literary thrillers of our times, we could expect a bit of gravitas or even attitude from him. Nope. In fact, Abrahams is the friendly sort who's so enamored of his dogs that, after a shrewd prompt from his wife,...


The blues invade Bank Street with a three-day fest this weekend

If you woke up this morning, you either have the blues or you got yourself a beer. Possibly both. Either way, the Blues on Bank festival, taking place Saturday and Sunday in the Hygienic Art Park, is a hard-to-resist opportunity. Saturday features Dr. G and the Believers (3:30 p.m.),...


Apollo 11 and moon rocks: Some lost, some stolen, others still waiting to be studied

“We have seen a renewed interest in the moon, which has inspired scientists to ask new questions,” said Andrea Mosie, a scientist and curator of NASA’s lunar specimens at Johnson Space Center in Houston. “By maintaining samples in a pristine state we are able to continue...

TRENDING

PODCASTS