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Yellow Farmhouse offers series with local authors exploring food and gender

Starting Jan. 27, the Yellow Farmhouse in Stonington will hold a series of virtual discussions designed to consider where people's beliefs, emotional connections, and behavior patterns about food come from.

A press release from the Yellow Farmhouse explains, "Food informs and is informed by our identity. The foods that we prepare, eat, and enjoy are reflections of our racial or ethnic background, our geographical provenance, our family, and — as we'll explore in this virtual series — our gender."

The four-week series, with all sessions starting at 6 p.m., will feature: 

Jan. 27: Rachel Black, associate professor of anthropology at Connecticut College, who will read from her new book, "Cheffes de Cuisine: Women and Work in the Professional French Kitchen," and share insights from her research on Lyon, a region of France known for its female-led kitchens.

Feb. 3: Debbi Michiko Florence, local resident and author of several books for children and young adults, will discuss how she uses food to explore culture and gender stereotypes in her writing. She will also share excerpts from "Niki Nakayama: a Chef’s Tale in 13 Bites" and "Jasmine Toguchi, Mochi Queen."

Feb. 10: Emily J.H. Contois, assistant professor of media studies at the University of Tulsa and author of "Diners, Dudes and Diets: How Gender and Power Collide in Food Media and Culture." She will discuss the “gendering” of various foods and activities related to cooking and eating. 

Feb. 16: Priya Fielding-Singh, sociologist and assistant professor at the University of Utah, will read from her new book, "How the Other Half Eats." In it, she explores the complexities of food and parenting, particularly how they play out differently among families of various socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds.

All programs are free for students and teachers and are $8 for the general public ($25 for the series). Visit www.yellowfarmhouse.org to register.

The Yellow Farmhouse Education Center, located on Stone Acres Farm in Stonington, aims to connect people to each other and to where their food comes from through food and farm-based education.

 

 

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