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    Saturday, October 01, 2022

    EMS Training

    Ella Chiasson works on treating a patient as students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill at the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians Exam on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (Sarah Gordon/The Day)
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    Jillian Vichi, left, and Falens Joseph work on putting a patient on a backboard as students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill at the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians Exam on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (Sarah Gordon/The Day)
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    Lily Zhang talks to classmates about treatments as students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill at the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians Exam on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (Sarah Gordon/The Day)
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    Katie Kydd works on treating a mannequin, as students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill at the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians Exam on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (Sarah Gordon/The Day)
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    Drew Sager works on triaging patients, as students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill at the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians Exam on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (Sarah Gordon/The Day)
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    Anna Limburg, left, and Katie Kydd work on setting up oxygen tanks for patients, as students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill at the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians Exam on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (Sarah Gordon/The Day)
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    Chris Mandelburg works on preparing a patient for treatment, as students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill at the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians Exam on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022. (Sarah Gordon/The Day)
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    Students in the Emergency Medical Technician Initial Basic Training class at New London Adult & Continuing Education work on an emergency drill outside the school Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2022. This is the final week of the seven-week course that typically sees mainly high school and college students taking the class for credit or to work with various local departments, said Steve Christina, Instructor of Emergency Training Services. “We wanted to get them out of the classroom, into the field today,” he said of the staged mass casualty incident. Students were working on using triage, treatment and transportation skills in preparation for the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians Exam they are taking on Saturday, Aug. 6, 2022.

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