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Ginsburg 'home and doing well' after hospitalization

WASHINGTON - Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg left Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore Wednesday where she'd been admitted for treatment of a possible infection.

The court's spokeswoman, Kathy Arberg, said in an emailed statement that Ginsburg "is home and doing well" but provided no other details about the justice's condition.

Ginsburg went to the hospital Tuesday after experiencing fevers and chills. The court said she was given an endoscopic procedure "to clean out a bile duct stent that was placed last August." Ginsburg seems to have recovered quicker than anticipated. The court said Tuesday that she was expected to remain in the hospital for several days.

At 87, Ginsburg is the oldest member of the nation's highest court and the leader of its liberal wing. In recent years, Ginsburg has reached cult-level status among the left.

Since being appointed to the high court by President Bill Clinton in 1993, Ginsburg has had a number of health scares. Last summer, she received treatment for pancreatic cancer that forced her to miss oral arguments for the first time in her career. It was the fourth time she'd been treated for cancer. Earlier this year, she declared herself cancer free.

Ginsburg's health is of great concern to Democrats who fear a scenario in which President Donald Trump fills her seat with a third conservative justice who would tilt the court even further right. In his first term, Trump has already placed two Supreme Court judges, Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh.

Given Ginsburg's age, as well as the ages of Justice Clarence Thomas, 72, and Justice Stephen Breyer, 81, the outcome of the 2020 presidential election could determine the makeup of the Supreme Court for generations.

The Washington Post's Mark Berman contributed to this report.

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