New London police charge city man with murder of Joshua Fine

Police charged David Carson Edwards Monday night with the April 2 shooting death of 27-year-old Joshua Fine near Elm Street and Garfield Avenue. (Photo courtesy of New London Police)
Police charged David Carson Edwards Monday night with the April 2 shooting death of 27-year-old Joshua Fine near Elm Street and Garfield Avenue. (Photo courtesy of New London Police)

New London — Police charged a city man Monday night with the April 2 shooting death of 27-year-old Joshua Fine near Elm Street and Garfield Avenue.

David Carson Edwards, also known as “DC Edwards” and “Jerzey,” 39, of 4 Steward St., Apt. 2, was arrested at his home without incident at 7:12 p.m. after police obtained a warrant for his arrest on the charge of murder. Edwards was being held Monday night on a $1.5 million cash bond and will be arraigned Tuesday in New London Superior Court. Police, who were assisted with the arrest by members of the Statewide Narcotics Task Force-East, released no other details.

At 1:04 a.m. on April 2, police were called to the scene of the shooting and found Fine lying on the ground with a gunshot wound. First responders administered first aid and took Fine to Lawrence + Memorial Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

A Garfield Avenue resident said after the shooting that he had just gotten home from work and was preparing to eat when he heard a ruckus outside around 12:30 a.m. When he looked through a window, he saw six to eight men fighting across the street, near the American Legion.

The man said the fight seemed to be dying down when he heard "a couple of gunshots."

Fine’s oldest sister, Amber Blow of Vermont, said after the shooting that he was one of nine children and the youngest of the boys.

“He was a very giving person. He had a big heart. He was always smiling and dancing. He went to church every Sunday," she said, adding that “what Josh did most was take care of family.”

Friends and family who gathered the night after the shooting on Elm Street said that while Fine may have been involved in some illegal activity he always looked out for his friends and family.

According to state judicial records, Fine had 13 convictions dating back to 2009 for offenses such as possession of narcotics with intent to sell, larceny, violation of a protective order and reckless endangerment. He was on probation at the time of his death. A week before his death he had been arrested and charged with selling crack cocaine and then leading police on a car chase in which he struck multiple vehicles.

 

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