Race Rock Lighthouse under new management

Fog blankets Race Rock Lighthouse, as seen during a boat tour for officials and the media following a ceremony Thursday to transter the deed to the lighthouse from the U.S. Coast Guard to the New London Maritime Society.
Buy Photo Tim Martin/The Day Fog blankets Race Rock Lighthouse, as seen during a boat tour for officials and the media following a ceremony Thursday to transter the deed to the lighthouse from the U.S. Coast Guard to the New London Maritime Society.

New London - A ceremony Thursday transferred ownership of Race Rock Lighthouse from the U.S. Coast Guard to the New London Maritime Society.

The ceremony took place behind the Custom House.

It took seven years, from 1871 through 1878, to build Race Rock Lighthouse, which includes a granite, Gothic Revival, keeper's house. The light is located in the Race, the narrows between Fishers Island and the northeastern end of Long Island Sound.

Under the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act, the U.S. General Services Administration has transferred 96 lights out of federal ownership, 63 to preservation groups at no cost and 33 sold at public auction.

Capt. James Fleishell of East Lyme, a member of the board of directors of the New London Maritime Society, reacts during a ceremony Thursday in which the U.S. General Services Administration turned over the deed to the Race Rock Lighthouse to the New London Maritime Society. The ceremony took place behind the Custom House in New London.
Buy Photo Tim Martin/The Day Capt. James Fleishell of East Lyme, a member of the board of directors of the New London Maritime Society, reacts during a ceremony Thursday in which the U.S. General Services Administration turned over the deed to the Race Rock Lighthouse to the New London Maritime Society. The ceremony took place behind the Custom House in New London.
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