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    Friday, April 19, 2024

    Eelgrass restoration in the Thames River

    Grace Bucci, a senior environmental studies major at Connecticut College, glues eelgrass seeds to the shell of a clam Friday, Oct. 20, 2023, to be placed in the reef balls at the school’s Camel Reef site on the Thames River. The college is working on the eelgrass restoration project with a recent grant and through a partnership with Save the Sound. Seeds will be attached to 800 clams and 20% of them are expected to germinate when the clams bury themselves. The college is working with Indian River Shellfish of Clinton and Norm Blume & Son Shellfish in Westbrook on the project, which is also funded by 11th Hour Racing Foundation. (Dana Jensen/The Day)
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    Clams that have 10 to 12 eelgrass seeds glued to their shells at Connecticut College’s Camel Reef site on the Thames River on Friday, Oct. 20, 2023. As part of an eelgrass restoration project, the clams were placed inside reef balls at the site. Seeds attached to 800 clams will germinate after the clams bury themselves. (Dana Jensen/The Day)
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    Maria Rosa, professor of marine biology at Connecticut College, and David Hudson, research scientist and president and chief executive officer of Remote Ecologist, look out over Connecticut College’s Camel Reef site Friday, Oct. 20, 2023, while discussing the placement of eelgrass seeds glued to clams that will be placed inside reef balls as part of an eelgrass restoration project. The college is working on the project with a recent grant and through a partnership with Save the Sound. Students glued eelgrass seeds to 800 clams that were later placed inside reef balls at the site. Twenty percent of the seeds are expected to germinate when the clams bury themselves. The college works with Indian River Shellfish of Clinton and Norm Blume & Son Shellfish in Westbrook on the project, which is also funded by 11th Hour Racing Foundation. (Dana Jensen/The Day)
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    Robert Vasiluth, of Long Island, shows Grace Bucci, a senior environmental studies major at Connecticut College, how to glue eelgrass seeds to the shell of a clam Friday, Oct. 20, 2023. The clams will be placed in Connecticut College’s Camel Reef site on the Thames River. The college is working on the project with a recent grant and through a partnership with Save the Sound. Students glued eelgrass seeds to 800 clams that were later placed inside reef balls at the site. Twenty percent of the seeds are expected to germinate when the clams bury themselves. The college works with Indian River Shellfish of Clinton and Norm Blume & Son Shellfish in Westbrook on the project, which is also funded by 11th Hour Racing Foundation. Vasiluth is the person that came up with the idea to use the clams with seeds to germinate the eelgrass. (Dana Jensen/The Day)
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    David Hudson, research scientist and president and chief executive officer of Remote Ecologist, left, works with Zachary Lane, center, and Mari Fullerton, right, both grad students at the University of Connecticut and members of the group Scientific Divers at UConn use a pink line to plot out eelgrass locations so they can be later found at the Camel Reef site in the Thames River on Friday, Oct. 20, 2023. The clams will be placed in these plots next month. Connecticut College is working on the project with a recent grant and through a partnership with Save the Sound. The college works with Indian River Shellfish of Clinton and Norm Blume & Son Shellfish in Westbrook on the project which is also funded by 11th Hour Racing Foundation. (Dana Jensen/The Day)
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    David Hudson, research scientist and president and chief executive officer of Remote Ecologist, left, works with Zachary Lane, center, and Mari Fullerton, right, both grad students at the University of Connecticut and members of the group Scientific Divers at UConn use a pink line to plot out eelgrass locations so they can be later found at the Camel Reef site in the Thames River on Friday, Oct. 20, 2023. The clams will be placed in these plots next month. The college is working on the project with a recent grant and through a partnership with Save the Sound. Connecticut College works with Indian River Shellfish of Clinton and Norm Blume & Son Shellfish in Westbrook on the project which is also funded by 11th Hour Racing Foundation. (Dana Jensen/The Day)
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    New London ― A group of people worked Friday to glue eelgrass seeds onto 800 clams, which will be placed in the Camel Reef site in the Thames River as part of an eelgrass restoration project. An estimated 20% of the seeds will germinate when the clams bury themselves.

    Eelgrass habitat has been declining in Long Island Sound for years. Recently, there has been support for restoring eelgrass in the Sound from New York, Connecticut and the Environmental Protection Agency.

    The project is a joint venture between Connecticut College, Indian River Shellfish of Clinton and Norm Blume & Son Shellfish in Westbrook and is also funded by 11th Hour Racing Foundation.

    Connecticut College students will compare how their eelgrass plots are doing compared to the Clinton and Westbrook sites.

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